Tag Archives: imported

Goed idee. The Internet of Places

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/internet_of_places.php

Het is interessant om te zien hoe we eindelijk de fase van het denken in save, files, folders en desktops voorbij gaan. De mappenstructuur en terminologie die is overgenomen van een archieflade lijkt eindelijk zijn langste tijd gehad te hebben.

Met de opkomst van mobiele interfaces en vooral 'the cloud' wordt het denken in bestanden langzaam losgelaten en krijgt het computertijdperk eindelijk zijn eigen taal en methodiek voor het ordenen van dingen.

Of places hier iets aan toe voegen? Vaak wel, maar net zo vaak niet. Het is in ieder geval een fris inzicht.

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From Floating Data to The Ground You Stand On: Creating an Internet of Places
The World Wide Web was originally created as a web of connected documents. What if that's no longer an appropriate, or sufficient, metaphor? A group of geospatial data specialists today published a ca…

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Mooie tegen elkaar afgezet; ecosystemen en organismen.

Mooie tegen elkaar afgezet; ecosystemen en organismen.

Reshared post from +Kevin Kelly

All companies die. All cities are nearly immortal.

Both are type of networks. But there are two basic network forms: organisms or ecosystems. Companies are like organisms, while cities are like ecosystems.

All organisms (and companies) have share many universal laws of growth. Creatures age in the same way, whether they are small animals, large mammals, starfish, bacteria, and even cells. All ecosystems (and cities) also share universal laws. They evolve and scale in a similar fashion among themselves — whether they are forests, meadows, coral reefs, or grasslands, or villages.

Geoff West from the Santa Fe Institute has piles of data to prove these universal and predictive laws of life. Organisms scale in a 3/4 law. For every doubling in size, they increase by less than one, or .75. The bigger the organism, the slower it goes. Both elephants and mice have the same number of heartbeats per lifespan, but he elephant beats slower.

Ecosystems, on the other hand, scale by greater than one, or 1.15. Every year they increase in wealth, crime, traffic, patents, pollution, disease, infrastructure, and per capita by 15%. The bigger the city, the faster it goes.

A less than one rate of exponential growth inevitably leads to an s-curve of stagnation. All organisms and companies eventually stagnate and die. A greater than one rate of exponential leads to a hockey stick upshot of seemingly unlimited growth. All cities keep growing. As West remarked: We can drop an atom bomb on a city and 30 years later it will be thriving.

The question Geoff West could not answer at tonight's Long Now talk was:

Is the internet more like a company or more like a city?

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Google Quarterly, dit keer over innovatie

Het ziet er op het eerste gezicht inhoudelijk en qua vormgeving goed uit.

http://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/quarterly/innovation/

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| Think Quarterly by Google
The Innovation Issue. We are, literally, more creative than ever. Think.Quarterly/Q3/2011/Welcome. The Eight Pillars of Innovation …we rely often on intuition and always on insights. Google_SVP.Adve…

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Wil dit boek bestellen, maar vraag me af of het echt nieuwe inzichten geeft

Iemand deze toevallig gelezen? Reviews?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1422124827/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE

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Design-Driven Innovation: Changing the Rules of Competition by Radically Innovating What Things Mean Pocket Mentor: Amazon.co.uk: Roberto Verganti: Books
Design-Driven Innovation: Changing the Rules of Competition by Radically Innovating What Things Mean Pocket Mentor: Amazon.co.uk: Roberto Verganti: Books

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Vrijdag de Writer applicatie gedownload voor de iPad en via bluetooth een toetsenbordje…

Vrijdag de Writer applicatie gedownload voor de iPad en via bluetooth een toetsenbordje aangesloten. De ideale setup om zonder afleiding iets te tikken.

http://www.informationarchitects.jp/en/writer-for-ipad/

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Information Architects – Writer for iPad
The key to good writing is not that magical glass of Bordeaux, the right kind of tobacco or that groovy background music. The key is focus. What you need to write well is a spartan setting that allows…

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Las gisteren dit artikel en het zoemt nog steeds rond in mijn hoofd.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/appsblog/2011/jul/15/app-developers-withdraw-us-patents

Patenten zijn ooit bedacht om innovatie juist te stimuleren, maar inmiddels lijkt het dat doel compleet voorbij geschoten te zijn. Patenten remmen inmiddels innovatie meer af dan dat ze het vooruit lijken te helpen.

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App developers withdraw from US as patent fears reach 'tipping point' | Technology | guardian.co.uk
Charles Arthur: Growth in US software patent lawsuits means independent developers are turning away from it as a place to do business – as Indian software company sends warning to tech giants

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