A List of Digital Design Resources

I design a lot of mock-ups and prototypes for products. Sometimes visual design is part of it, often it’s not. We design a product, make a business case with the client. Test it and start developing it. Most of our products are used within companies (B2B).

Last year I’ve been also “fixing” a lot of interactive products. Apps that technically function perfectly, but aren’t living up to the expectations in usage or behavior.

My favorite tools
I completely switched from Illustrator to Sketch last year. I use Keynote a lot and Invision to share prototypes within companies. The Sketch > Dropbox > Invision workflow works really well for me.

I played with Framer and this is definitely on my list for 2015. Since smart interaction becomes more complex, dynamic and difficult to explain without making interactive demo’s.

Here are some design libraries, references or prototyping software I bookmarked, it might help you. Want to add something to this list send me a tweet @wilbertbaan

Research
Typeform (forms)
Google Forms, use this a lot for getting a lot of insights, fast
Evernote, it’s the best way to combine notes, pictures of documents and photos

Prototyping
Pixate, prototyping tool
Mockuuups, Sketch & Photoshop mockups
Artefact Cards, Small cards for drawing and prototyping
UI8 wireframe kit
Proto.io mobile prototyping tool
Keynotopia, templates

Libraries
Sketch App Sources
Flaticon, icons
Facebox, Stock Avatars of real people
Iconic, SVG icon font

For journalists
Charted, make great looking charts from Google spreadsheets
Timeline JS, create timelines

References
A Designers Guide to DPI
MaterialUp, Material Design showcases
Physics based animations by Ralph Thomas
Pttrns, iPhone and iPad user interfaces
Google Material Design introduction
Cognitive Lode, a series of tips around applying Behavior Design in your design work
Zurb design triggers, more tips applying Behavior Design
WearUI.co, examples of wearable interfaces
Pinterest, there are thousands of interface and design examples on Pinterest
Brand identity style guides, browse through a large collection of identity style guides

Share this post
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone

The Design Industry Finds Itself Disrupted as Design Is Becoming a Crucial Part of Software Driven Businesses

In 2011 Marc Andreessen wrote his Why Software is Eating the World article on how software is becoming a crucial part in any company.

Software changed from the design of forms and objects into the design of interactive processes and systems. Design is becoming an indispensable part of the (software) system, much like the technology itself.

Orders of Design
Buchanan’s Orders of Design, also called: 2D, 3D, Proces, Purpose. Image: NirandFar

Disrupting an industry
And with every disruptive change it has an effects on the industry. The (interactive) design industry is more relevant than ever before. Changing how business is done from being bought as a service (agency model) to being internalized as part of the company.

Although this is not an overnight market change, something is changing. Design studio’s starting incubators and using their product design knowledge to kickstart startups. Or design studio’s being bought by software companies.

Design becoming an integral part of software and business and this is great for designers and for products.

Suggested readings
Wired: The Rapidly Disappearing Business of Design

PeterMe: San Francisco Design Agencies Feeling the Squeeze

Khoi Vinh: The Shift Away from Design Agencies Has Started in San Francisco

In 2013 I wrote how design is moving from the design of objects and interaction to the design of systems (in Dutch). Check Buchanan’s Orders of Design if you’re interested in this.

Share this post
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Join us for Behavior Design 7, part of the Amsterdam e-week

On november 4th, we’re organizing the 7th Behavior Design meetup together with Info.nl.

We’re really excited about this event. We have a great eclectic line-up. With presentations about Behavior Design in Health, light, spatial design and government regulation.

Behavior Design 7 meetup

These broad events are usually the ones where you learn the most ;)

2 out of 3 presentations will be in English. There are still a few spots available. This meetup is part of the Amsterdam e-week.

RSVP at meetup

Speakers

Location: Somehow (Bonte Zwaan) Haparandadam 7, ground floor
Doors open: 18:30, start presentations 19:00

Share this post
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Smart Cities out of Control

This is an interesting talk by Bruce Sterling about the Smart Cities of the future.

As we see more global internet services being successfully rolled out to people and becoming a fundamental part of how we move, do business and communicate we also become dependent of these services.

But what happens when technology becomes just ‘too’ important and out of reach of a community, city or country?

What is the Smart City?

via Alper

Share this post
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone

The morality of the designer

Last thursday we organized the 4th Behavior Design meetup. A gathering in Amsterdam where we connect designers, scientists and entrepreneurs to share ideas and lessons about behavior design.

Who’s in control?
We touched the discussion about the implications of designing behavior without people noticing it several times. Overal people are confused about this topic.

Nir Eyal – one of the speakers – said behavior design will have a wear out effect. The same effect you notice when you look at old commercials. “Did people really believe this?”.

Behavior Design Amsterdam 4 BDAMS

Attention as a business goal
In the digital landscape the design of a digital service that forces itself into your lifestyle can be an important business goal. Digital services are often focussed on attention and engagement.

Behavior design helps these services to succeed their goals. The addictive design elements in Facebook are an important part of it’s success (“you’re tagged in a photo, want to know what’s on the picture, come and visit”).

Is this right or wrong? It’s an interesting question because you usually don’t notice behavior design. The idea is to influence your behavior without you noticing. The result is that it changes something real. It changes the choices you make or it changes how you spend your time.

Making choices
A designer has always given meaning to a product or service by it’s design. Even if it’s not intentionally. Design is about making choices and choices are as much about what you do as what you don’t.

In the end behavior design is just like any other design tool. You can use it for good or bad. Designers can have a role in pointing out where it’s being used and what for. Since if you design this stuff, you’re likely better in noticing it.

The other thing that came up in the discussion is that effect or addiction in digital products is measurable. Facebook knows what group of people is unhealthy addicted to their service. You can design behavior for this group as well.

Share this post
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone

The merging principles of designing software and hardware

Joi Ito is being interviewed and talks about how methods for creating hardware and software are merging. We’re entering a prototyping era, where we can prototype just about anything.

Understanding manufacturing is going to be key to design, just like understanding the Internet has become key to running a company.

The interview is promotion for the Solid Conference. It pushes you to think again about the future of designing products.

Via O’Reilly Radar

Share this post
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone

The 4th behavior design meetup with Nir Eyal, Kars Alfrink and Dariu Gavrila

This month we’re organizing the 4th Behavior Design Meetup Amsterdam. A mix of technologists, designers and researchers talking about influencing behavior by design. And we have only 7 5 spots left.

For this meetup we have a diverse range of speakers. Bay Area investor, author and consultant Nir will talk about how to build habit-forming products. Game designer Kars wil talk about how playful interactions can trigger intrinsic behavior and intelligent perception systems professor David will talk about how technology sees and acts for us.

BDAMS2

Photo by Dervin Sno

Nir Eyal
Nir Eyal writes, consults, and teaches about the intersection of psychology, technology, and business. He is the author of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. Nir founded two tech companies since 2003 and has taught at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford.

Nir is also an advisor to several Bay Area start-ups , venture capitalists, and incubators. Nir’s last company received venture funding from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and was acquired in 2011. In addition to blogging at NirAndFar.com, Nir is a contributing writer for Forbes, TechCrunch, and Psychology Today.

Nir will be in Amsterdam for a few more days. He will be at the Hooked workshop and Habbit Summit.

Kars Alfrink
Kars Alfrink (MA, Utrecht School of the Arts) is a designer active in the area of games, play, technology and society. Currently, he is principal designer at Hubbub, a Dutch/German design studio focussed on inventing games and forms of play that open up possibilities in existing contexts and create new ways for people to have fun and do things together.

Kars initiated and co-curated the Dutch offshoot of This happened, a series of events about the stories behind interaction design. He has worked as an educator and researcher at the Utrecht School of the Arts, and before that as an interaction designer at a couple of web agencies.

Dariu Gavrila
Dariu M. Gavrila received the PhD degree in computer science from the University of Maryland at College Park, USA, in 1996. Since 1997, he has been with Daimler R&D in Ulm, Germany, where he is currently a Senior Research Scientist. In 2003, he was further appointed professor at the University of Amsterdam, chairing the area of Intelligent Perception Systems (part time).

Over the past 15 years, Prof. Gavrila has focused on visual systems for detecting humans and their activity, with application to intelligent vehicles, smart surveillance and social robotics. He led the multi-year pedestrian detection research effort at Daimler, which materialized in the Mercedes-Benz E-Class and S-Class models (2013).

He is frequently cited in the scientific literature and he received the I/O 2007 Award from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) as well as several conference paper awards.

Share this post
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone